Truth Universal Unleashes Decolonization!

New Album and
New Single!
 
Houston, TX — Creating
music in one of the most culturally-rich regions in the world has given
Truth Universal a masterful edge on his craft. Despite trying times for
himself and his community in New Orleans, Truth Universal recently put the
finishing touches on his new album, Decolonization, which will be
released in February 2006 on Dragon’s Breath Records/Day By Day Entertainment.
The first single from the album, “Mindframe “, features a West Coast cameo
from Zion, of the Bay Area group Zion I. Truth has made the
song available for stream or download at
www.tygereye.net/truthuniversal
 
Truth Universal asserts
that while his music appeals to Hip Hop fans around the
globe, he embraces the diverse palette of Southern rap. “You got
a lot of cats that talk about struggle and hustle,” he explains. “I talk
about it too, but I put in a context where that may be something that causes you
to seek self-determination, and maybe evaluate where we are as a people in
America. It’s the same struggle, but from a different perspective. What I do is
some real turntable, emcee and deejay Hip Hop. “
 
The past two months have been a
turbulent time for Truth, as he and his family were relocated to
Houston in the tragic aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.
He courageously maintained his ambition as he completed the
album, and he is hopeful that  fans will recognize and relate to
his experiences through the music and beyond.
 
You can download Truth
Universal’s new video for “Mindframe” featuring Zion of Zion I at:
 
For more information on Truth
Universal, go to
www.tygereye.net/truthuniversal and www.truthuniversal.com
 
For interviews and press
information, contact
dove@tygereye.net
 
Truth Universal
Bio
Truth Universal’s distinctive
voice is striving to pave a path of righteousness rarely associated with New
Orleans or the South as a whole. His music is the reflective diary of an emcee
with strong convictions about his life, concerns about the oppression of his
people, and Hip Hop preservation.
 
A man of diverse backgrounds,
Truth Universal moved from the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago to New Orleans
when he was 4-years-old. Upon discovering Hip Hop in its earlier variations,
Truth Universal aspired to be a deejay, and dabbled in B-boying and freestyle
emceeing in high school. Being the only Caribbean born child in his
neighborhood, political messages of Calypso from the likes of Mighty Sparrow and
Calypso Rose, and Reggae from Bob Marley combined with Hip Hop to mold Truth
Universal into the artist he is today.
 
At the time Truth was growing up
in New Orleans, producers like Mannie Fresh and KLC, who would go onto craft the
sounds of Cash Money and No Limit respectively, were making music similar to the
legendary Mantronix. Truth Universal was inspired to start rhyming by a variety
of artists and freedom fighters, and as his sound developed, he often found
himself at odds with his surroundings. Politics engulfed the underground scene,
ultimately affecting performances, stable resources, and networking in a town
known for artists promoting the ¬Ç√Ñ√≤bling bling’ lifestyle.
 
More seriously, he was affected
by the recent tragedy of Hurricane Katrina. Truth managed to evacuate a day
before the storm struck, but lost his house and possessions. He relocated his
family to Houston, and, despite the amazing challenges, focused on releasing his
new album, Decolonization (inspired by Frantz Fanon’s A Dying
Colonialism
). The lead single “Mindframe ” featuring Zion of Zion I pushes
listeners on the conscious path. Decolonization also features Damien of the
Legendary K-O (aka K-Otix).
 
“I think what the people see is
one side of the coin, there’s more to it than what’s exploited in the commercial
arena there, ” says Truth Universal of his approach on the album. “Token people
represent a facet of the whole pie. You have one artist as the political
spokesperson on a major label, you have the underground Hip Hop representatives
over here, and then you have what you see the most – the exploitation of the
material and women and whatever they want to publicize. The radio isn’t
representative of what’s really here, because I actually feel good about Hip Hop
right now.  On an independent level there’s so much good stuff going on,
that I feel like sooner or later it’s going to pop and light will be shed on
it. ”
 
Decolonization
offers an introspective look into a region that is largely stereotyped. “You can
expect a different take on a brother living in New Orleans, ” explains Truth.
“It’s not too different from what you’d hear from Juvenile or Cash Money, as far
as it coming from the working class standpoint.  I’m from a single parent
household and we dealt with the same poverty.  You got a lot of cats that
talk about struggle and hustle. I talk about it too, but I put in a context
where that may be something that causes you to seek self-determination and maybe
evaluate where we are as a people in America. I also talk about the male-female
relationships, striving to get paid or ‘come up’, injustice, biased laws, and
the streets. It’s the same struggle, but from a different perspective. What I do
is some real turntable, emcee and deejay Hip Hop. ”

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