Cam’ron Issues a Statement

Cam'RonHarlem rapper Cam’ron recently shot par for the course on a 60 minute interview segment on snitching. Notable highlight of the clip is Killah Cam saying he wouldn’t tell the cops if he knew there was a serial killer living next door but he would move. Yup, so if Cam is your neighbor and he suddenly up and bounces you may want to put in a call to UHaul yourself. Some people have said that Cam’ron was set up. That given his professional image he couldn’t answer any other way than he did. Yea well Al Roker said he’d didn’t feel any need to lose weight, his heart disagreed and now we have a lot less Al and a lot more tv screen real estate to see the people behind him when he’s on air. My point is this, yes due to Cam’s image he was kind of in a hard position but that’s a weak argument at best. We are talking about people’s lives here. Innocent people’s lives.

I’m sure there was a bit of controversy surrounding Cam’s answers in the interview especially in the wake of Hip Hop being put on trial for a 300 year old caucasian radio host’s verbal vomit; go figure how we got the blame for that one. Anyway, below the is the video for the 60 minutes interview if you haven’t seen it and below that is Cam’Ron’s statement. Question is, is his retraction due to actual maturity or PR damage control?

The 60 minutes interview where highly intelligent and adult responses by Cam’Ron were given.

STATEMENT OF CAMERON GILES, DIPLOMAT RECORDS

“In 2005, I was a victim of a violent crime. I was shot multiple times without provocation by two armed men who attempted to carjack my vehicle. Although I was a crime victim, I didn’t feel like I could cooperate with the police investigation. Where I come from, once word gets out that you’ve cooperated with the police that only makes you a bigger target of criminal violence. That is a dark reality in so many neighborhoods like mine across America. I’m not saying its right, but its reality. And it’s not unfounded. There’s a harsh reality around violence and criminal justice in our inner cities.

“But my experience in no way justifies what I said. Looking back now, I can see how those comments could be viewed as offensive, especially to those who have suffered their own personal tragedies or to those who put their lives on the line to protect our citizens from crime. Please understand that I was expressing my own personal frustration at my own personal circumstances. I in no way was intending to be malicious or harmful. I apologize deeply for this error in judgment.”

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